Friday, May 10, 2019

Trans+: Love, Sex, Romance, and Being You



Trans+: Love, Sex, Romance, and Being You by Kathryn Gonzales and Karen Rayne is excellently self-described as “a ground-breaking, all-inclusive, uncensored must-have guide for teens who are transgender, nonbinary, gender-nonconforming, gender-fluid, or questioning their gender identity, and for cis-allies” (Gonzales & Rayne, back cover).

For the sake of this blog post, I would like to state I am a cis woman, so I am coming from an ally perspective, and therefore I cannot speak to the accuracy of the trans experience that is depicted and described. Although I cannot speak to the accuracy of this aspect, the novel is written by a trans woman and includes many diaries of teens with a variety of gender expressions and sexual identities explaining their experiences with being transgender, nonbinary, gender-nonconforming, gender-fluid, or questioning their identity.

­ Trans+ is an incredibly welcoming book, with a muted grey cover and the title is in the colors of the trans flag. It starts off introducing the backgrounds of the authors of the book and teens interviewed for the diary entries. 

In media, it can sometimes seem as if there is only one way to be trans, and that is to be passing as cisgender, but Gonzales and Rayne break this misconception down. Trans+ does not describe the process of transitioning as perfect and emphasizes that no one transition is “ideal” or has to follow a certain set of rules. Gonzales and Rayne break down stigma surrounding the discussion of gender and sexuality and approach it in an understandable manner, and yet the readers are never babied or talked down to.

Diverging from the written content, I would like to point to the pictures in this book and applaud the illustrator, although they are not named in the book. I cannot include copies of the illustrations, but I can promise that the illustrations are excellent, depicting people of varying races, religions, and (dis)abilities.

This book is not perfect; I would recommend a bit more of an emphasis on the potential dangers of improper chest binding and how that could permanently damage chest tissue (Gonzales & Rayne, 109), but they do somewhat caution to be aware of how you are physically feeling when binding. There may be inaccuracies I was not aware of, but it overall seems incredibly inclusive and well researched.

There were some issues with paragraphs repeating exactly, a couple typos, and some more terms should be added to the glossary, including ‘neutrois’ and some other terms, but this is something that can be easily fixed.

Trans+ is an excellent book, and after additional reviewing I believe it should be in all schools and libraries for teens and adults alike of all identities to access. Trans+ is set to be published in August of 2019 through Magination Press, and I highly recommend you all check it out. I look forward to the final copy being released!

-SS

Citation: Gonzales, Kathryn, and Karen Rayne. Trans+: Love, Sex, Romance, and Being You.      Magination Press, 2019.

Wednesday, May 8, 2019

Jacob's Room to Choose-and our Book to Choose





According to Fran Wilde in the article, “Three children’s authors on the importance of tough topics in young people’s literature,” “Children’s literature has a long history of engaging with tough topics in small and large ways and wrapping them up in adventure” (washingtonpost.com).  Sarah and Ian Hoffman’s picture book, Jacob’s Room to Choose, is no exception. The story follows Jacob and Sophie, two gender non-conforming children, as they go about their day at school. Jacob is introduced as a young boy (according to the pronouns used in the story) who is stereotypically “girly” toting a blonde bob and a green dress, while his friend, Sophie, sports a bouffant Afro and wears khakis and a button-down shirt. When we first read Jacob’s Room to Choose, we thought it was perfect. It challenges gender binaries, so really, what more could we ask for?

Just a bit more. Maybe?

Although choosing to address the issue of gender non-conforming bathrooms in a children’s picture book is an amazing idea, the forced assumptions at the beginning of the book detracts from its overall purpose. The story begins with “Jacob and Sophie loved library time.” (n.p.) The names, however, do not match how the children are arranged in the beautifully rendered illustration by Chris Case. The reader is forced to assume that Jacob is on the left and Sophie is on the right because the names are ordered that way. However, the accompanying image shows Sophie lying on the left and Jacob lying on the right. This misleading pattern continues for a few more pages: “Jacob and Sophie raised their hands (Sophie is again on the reader’s left side and Jacob is on the right).” “Sophie walked through one door./ Jacob took a deep breath and walked through the other.” (n.p.) This time Jacob stands on the left facing the sign that indicates the restroom for boys and Sophie stands on the right side facing the opposite sign. Rather than allowing the reader to make the mistake of mis-identifying the children themselves, the text is arranged in such a way that forces this assumption on the reader. This seems like a missed opportunity for the reader, especially the adult reader, to challenge their own assumptions about gender norms.

One thing Sarah and Ian Hoffman do incredibly well is they refuse to give Jacob a pronoun until the sixth page of the book when Jacob walks into the boys’ restroom: “Two boys were at the sinks. They stared at Jacob standing in the doorway. Jacob knew what that look meant. He turned and ran out.” With the first time Jacob is called “he”, we are provided with the insight that this is not the first time that Jacob has felt uncomfortable going to the boys’ restroom.

This key moment in the restroom can be a very small glimpse into the challenges gender non-conforming children and adults alike may face every day. The author is forced to give Jacob a pronoun when Jacob is within the boys’ restroom, faced by two other boys. Just “that look” is a moment that pulls at us. Jacob knows what “that look” is, he has faced this situation before and appears to be fearful, as he runs out with “his heart pounding”. In this moment, any gender non-conforming person can probably relate to Jacob’s intense fear in this moment.

Later, Ms. Reeves’s activity and subsequent discussion leads Jacob and Sophie’s classmates to consider their own assumptions about where they fit and where the rules say they fit. Ms. Reeves draws a picture of a boy and girl on the board and then asks the question, “‘Are these pictures of what boys and girls really look like?’” the children’s responses vaguely introduces the possibility of non-binary thinking:
“Yes,” said Emily.
“No,” said Sophie.
“Sometimes,” said Jacob. (n.p.)
Emily, who rejects being placed in the boy’s group because she’s wearing pants, still does not understand fully the limitations of strict gender rules outlined in Ms. Reeves’s exercise. Sophie, who rejects performing stereotypical gender norms, gives a different answer. Jacob’s answer, however, offers a third option when he responds, “‘Sometimes,’” (n.p.).

Mike Cadden tells us that “Regardless of the way that a YA novel represents the consciousness of the young adult--by character narration or by external narration that focalizes through young characters--it can produce double-voicedness” (148). In much the same way, Sarah and Ian Hoffman control Jacob’s consciousness in his narrative to create this double-voicedness that both tells what happened and presents a moral. The moral--children like Jacob should be allowed to use whatever restroom they are comfortable using--comes through clearly. However, Jacob’s sadness about not being able to choose is faint and relegated to the background of the story. In the author’s note, Sarah and Ian Hoffman discuss their son, Sam and the purpose behind the picture book. In kindergarten, Sam had waist length hair and loved wearing a pink dress (n.p.). While this author’s note explains the purpose this book, points to a known issue in literature written by adults for children.

They go on to say, “Sam’s interests were a mix of traditional ‘girl’ things like ballet, make-believe, and art, mixed with traditional ‘boy’ things like knights, castles, and dinosaurs, Clinically, children like Sam are called gender-nonconforming; we liked to call him a pink boy--the male equivalent of a tomboy” (n.p.). As soon as we read the author’s note, we began to feel wary about the wording. This reduction of their child to a clinical definition and immediately casting Sam out as “not a traditional boy,” though most likely not intentionally, enforces a gender binary. Sam wears dresses, therefore; he is immediately categorized as an “other” instead of simply a child.

(SS)
(KT)

Works Cited
Hoffman, Sarah, and Ian Hoffman. Jacob's Room to Choose. Magination Press, 2019.
Cadden, Mike. “The Irony of Narration in the Young Adult Novel.” Children's Literature Association Quarterly, Johns Hopkins University Press, 1 Jan. 2009, muse.jhu.edu/article/249865/pdf.
Wilde, Fran. “Three Children’s Authors on the Importance of Tough Topics in Young People’s Literature.” The Washington Post, 9 Apr. 2019, www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/2019/04/09/three-childrens-authors-importance-tough-topics-young-peoples-literature/?utm_term=.7bda654513fe.

Sunday, May 5, 2019

A Few Words for June Cummins




On Friday May 3, the SDSU English department came together to celebrate the life of June Cummins. Although I never had the pleasure of meeting June, her fellow friends and colleagues painted a picture of June as a clever, quick witted woman with infectious laughter and more than enough love for everyone.

June came to be known by many things: Michelle Martin lovingly refers to June as her “Conference Wife”, Michael Borgstrom thinks of her affectionately as “Junelah”, and Yetta Howard felt honored to call her a trusted confidant. Although she may go by different names, everyone thinks of June as a beloved friend who will be dearly missed.

Joseph Thomas captured June’s vibrancy in his piece “A Few Words for June”, which can be found below, and Michael Joseph portrayed her strong will and passion for justice in describing her letters raising awareness of the use of the swastika in a children’s alphabet book.

We laughed together as Mary Garcia reminisced over her discussions with June about what to have for dinner, and tears were brought to our eyes as Lissa Paul illustrated June’s passion for family and friends: June taught at San Diego State by day and would fly home to have dinner with her family and help her kids with homework back in Chicago.

Thank you to everyone who came to honor June Cummins’ life, and we thank those honoring June from afar. She has left a lasting imprint on our community at SDSU, and on many of our hearts as well.

Our Director and June's dear friend, Joseph Thomas, wrote this piece to honor June. We thank him for sharing such touching words on their friendship with us. We reproduce it below:

A Few Words for June Cummins 

My name is Joseph Thomas, and I’m a professor here in the Department of English and Comparative Literature. I’m also the director of the National Center for the Study of Children’s Literature. June was instrumental in my joining the SDSU faculty, and were she not such a dear friend, and had she not so convincingly advocated for me, I doubt I’d be here today. Today. It’s just so wrong that she’s not here too, today, that we’re not still teaching together, working together, supporting one another as the spring semester wraps up. And 2007, the year I joined SDSU’s faculty seems so very recent. As does the year 2000, when we first met in Roanoke, VA, at an academic conference. So recent, yet also so long ago. It’s difficult to remember what it was like before I knew June; it’s like we were always friends. She should still be here. Today. Instead of this. Or at least she should be in the air heading back to Chicago for the weekend. But here we are. Today. And today we honor June Cummins. Remember her. 

June completed her MA back in 1986. Her PhD. in 1998. Her first publication was “Romancing the Plot: The Real Beast of Disney's Beauty and the Beast,” which was published in 1995. And she was presenting at national and international conferences even earlier. As a result of her early and prolific start as a scholar, June decided, even after she married, to continue to publish under the name June Cummins, and it is under that name that her professional and academic work is remembered, and it is by that name that many of her students and colleagues know her. So today, we honor June Cummins, our dear friend, our dear colleague. And today would be impossible without the really very hard – and too often thankless – work of Kim Navarro. You didn’t know June, but I can guarantee that she would have adored you. You’re a delight to work with, and your labor on behalf of today’s event, on behalf of June; your kind, thoughtful way of doing things, of getting things done – it just means the world to me. So thank you, Kim. And Michael Borgstrom. You’ve been so generous with your time; you’ve put so much emotional labor into today’s event; and you’ve been such a steadfast and wise friend for so long, but especially throughout June’s illness and, crucially – indispensably – after her passing: Words fail me. It’s difficult to overstate just how really, very hard Michael worked on making today happen. I know June would be grateful. And I know I am. When today honors June, when it summons her memory, when it moves you, June’s friends and family – inherited or invented – when it’s as special and unique and as affecting as I hope it will be, credit Michael. When it’s lacking, when it fails – when it’s rough and tiresome: blame me. 

Now. A Few Words for June Cummins. 

It’s harder than it looks, kids, writing this kind of thing. And the darkest irony is the simple fact that June was the person I’d turn to for help when writing this kind of thing. She was so good at knowing what was tasteful, what was right. In 2017, I wrote an essay honoring Alida Allison for our department newsletter. She had just retired. It began, “It’s difficult writing these things about retired friends.” And it is. But I had no idea, when I was writing, that, by 2019, just a month or so ago, Alida would be dead. I found out that she was terminally ill, in fact, when I wrote her about today’s event. Alida was among those who first welcomed June to SDSU as a colleague and, eventually, a friend. I wanted Alida to speak today—she was wise as she was good, and I knew she could help us all put June’s life in perspective, help us figure our loss. Alida couldn’t speak when I contacted her, or speaking was very difficult. So she had to decline, but she still hoped to attend, virtually if not physically. But now she speaks only in her absence. Her wisdom unavailable. 

When I was a young man, introduction to literature classes often spoke of The Grand Themes of Literature—generally characterized as “universal” themes. We’ve largely put that stuff behind us. But one of those themes still haunts: mutability. And if we eschew Universal Themes and embrace the contingent, set aside Grand Narratives for the micro, replace the Global for the local, well, that’s fine. But that’s also mutability. Even this building, Scripps Cottage, speaks loudly of mutability. Scripps Cottage is one of SDSU’s eight original structures. Together with our campus’s original quad and the five other buildings who owe their existence to the Works Progress Administration, the Cottage is part of a federally designated historic district. In 1963, this building served as the reception area for President John F. Kennedy, who had come to SDSU to deliver the commencement address and receive an honorary doctorate. It wasn’t here then. It was over there, near the Faculty-Staff Club, up the hill, where it was constructed in 1931. Ellen Browning Scripps ponied up most of the cash, the building built through monies she contributed to the local YWCA. Originally, it was a women’s center, serving as the headquarters for the Associated Women Students. In 1968 the Cottage was moved here to make way for the Love Library, the big Brutalist monstrosity that dominates the center of campus. The koi pond behind you and the groovy hills and trees, they were added in 1972, the year I was born. Alida was a student here in the 60s, floating here and there throughout the 70s, until she returned to study creative writing in our English department in the 1980s. She saw many of those changes. She knew this building. And she’s here now, if only embodied in language and, for some of us, in the stuff of memory. Permanence. Mutability. Binaries that deconstruct as readily as any other. 

I know June would appreciate being honored in this space—especially given the fact that this structure once served as a safe space for women in a world that was and too often still is unsafe. A darker kind of permanence. Some things don’t change, I suppose. Or they are too slow in changing. Today’s event adds to this building’s history. Its legacy. And for those of us who call this campus home, June’s memory will now animate this place, a kind of happy haunting that summons joy, that brightens the dark. Mutability. 

June haunts those of us who loved her. And if she will now haunt this place, by virtue of today’s event and the lingering associations today’s event will engender, she haunts other spaces as readily, even spaces she never touched. While I drove home the other afternoon in my little 2006 GTI, the White Stripes were playing. June loved the Stripes. Loved Jack White. And in my little white car—a car June never saw or sat in—her spirit manifested. Suddenly I was in another car, one June knew well, a beat-up 2004 Mini Cooper. A kind of time travel, a time trap. 

Day turned to night; the 8 turned to 4th and University. I was no longer alone and heading home, and, instead, I was on the road from Nunu’s to someplace else in that little green Cooper. June, Katie, and I listened to “Instinct Blues”: 

The flies get it. 
And the frogs get it. 
And all them big jungle cats get it. 
And I bet your little dog gets it. 
Yeah, I want you to get with it. 

I turned and saw June pressed into the back seat (Katie drove; I rode shotgun). June’s head reclined; her eyes closed; she smiled as the music played too loud. June was in her town, rambling about from joint to joint in a dirty little car – and she was digging it, she was home – or in one of her homes – but this was the home in which she once rambled about from joint to joint as a girl, as a teenager – time stacked on time stacked on time – where she still lived now (then) as a grown woman – but still stayed in her parents’ pad, once hers, still worried about staying out too late. A kind of magic took place on those late nights, magic that pressed forward into the present (I was driving home, then, on the 8, as I, now, stand before you, when transported back to that intersection in which June sat, reclined, eyes closed, in a car now gone), and that magic, then, inflected June’s long, busy days on campus. She’s still alive, a professor, a mentor, a scholar. Here – then – she was a girl, an adolescent, a college student, a professor – a mentor and friend. Time bended and warped; June was unstuck in time, as was I; she hung with a gang of ne’er-do-wells in a beat-up car, listening to music, putting off her homework – there’ll be time for that tomorrow. But tomorrow would bring her to campus, where she’d hang with college students whom she’d inspire and who would, in turn, animate her with their youthful vigor. She was a professional, a mentor, a star in her field (a kind of mantra, this); a professor, a teacher, an academic advisor, a senator, even. She is a key member of the San Diego Junior Theater’s executive board, a group she performed with as a girl. June was famous for her poor sense of direction.She’d call me for directions – once while lost in Balboa Park (I was on campus, flummoxed – for how could I help her get her bearings, miles away, in a place where she’d spent years as a child, a teen, and an adult?) – but of course she’d get disoriented. I was disoriented, even as I headed west on the 8. It’s daytime. It’s night. It’s 2008. It’s 2019. The city was in constant flux. Is in constant flux. We’re here. We’re over by the Faculty Club. The Love Library hasn’t yet been built. John F. Kennedy delivers the commencement address, receives an honorary doctorate. It’s 1963. It’s 1972. Spatially and temporally, San Diego spins eastward on the flesh of a globe turning on its axis, that globe, too, in prograde motion about our star, also spinning, taking with it its system of our sister planets, as it moves through darkness around our galaxy’s hub, that hub, too, whipping through the universe, dancing with its galactic neighbors in a celestial cluster: when and where and even who – a child, a teen, a seasoned scholar – all a vertiginous mess of selves and refigured relativities Professor Einstein couldn’t untangle. 

The art of losing isn’t hard to master; 
so many things seem filled with the intent 
to be lost that their loss is no disaster. 

The other day, Michael Borgstrom said to a graduate student (I paraphrase), “There are personal reasons I study early American Literature. I wasn’t alive when it was written, and I had to wrestle with why my interests lay there, why this literature is still important. And in answering, I can communicate to my readers why it might be important to them.” He then turned to me, adding, “There must be a reason Joseph studies children’s literature – he’s not a child anymore.” (He said it sweetly.) As he spoke those words I felt you there, June, a ghostly presence. You’re often there, in those moments, as you so often were there. Your absence a presence so massive it bends time and space, summons you from the past where you still live. You haunt the halls. 

Lose something every day. Accept the fluster
of lost door keys, the hour badly spent. 
The art of losing isn’t hard to master. 

June was there, that moment, just out of phase. I could almost hear her whisper hoarsely, “Me too.” I was hit hard, for an instant, because I could almost hear what June would add to Michael’s words. But that almost evaporated before it materialized. To imagine what June would say, what she might have said is impossible (or impossible to do accurately). For June was always unpredictable. Her insights by nature as surprising as they were provocative. That’s what we’ve lost: her uniquely Juneish way of putting things, whether in writing or in conversation. And not just her way of putting things, but the things she put. Always a joyful surprise. Still, I wondered for days after that brief haunting. Thought about June’s scholarly interests, how they, too, were deeply personal. How the place she worked, the place where she made her professional life – where she, as Lissa will suggest, made her life work, made work of her life - fairly hummed with childhood and adolescence. And I thought about the queer significance of the fact that when June wasn’t here in San Diego or with her husband and children in Chicago, she as often as not was in New York City, where she was born, the place of her childhood. Her adult life – mother, wife, matriarch – an island in Chicago bracketed by lives on either coast. Native New Yorker, native SoCaler, mentoring her young students and junior colleagues in the rich loam of her childhood. And from that fertile soil grew a career. Students budded from that career and matured into colleagues. And alongside those students, who owe so much to June’s patient counsel, grew a body of scholarly writing whose impact and influence is still being felt as it will continue being felt long after all of us in this room have followed June into death. Her legacy is in that work as much as it is in her family. Few have made so much in so little time. 

Then practice losing farther, losing faster: 
places, and names, and where it was you meant 
to travel. None of these will bring disaster. 

Cruising in the back seat of a Mini Cooper and listening to rock and roll, or hanging with me while I stole a smoke in the garage near Arts and Letters – well after the No Smoking ban had become the law of the land – or handing me a wad of bills so I could pay for drinks after sunset on the sabbath – but don’t tell, she’d smile – an adolescent act of rebellion in the face of her serious and adult desire to honor her heritage (she rests in Jerusalem, after all).

Her smile. The way she’d move her hands. Cross and uncross her skirted legs. So true and joyful. Even her anger was alive, sparking like an angry cat. "A cat's rage is beautiful, burning with a pure cat flame, all its hair standing up and crackling blue sparks, eyes blazing and sputtering.” 

I lost my mother’s watch. And look! my last, or 
next-to-last, of three loved houses went. 
The art of losing isn’t hard to master. 

We had a semi-standing ritual, Katie, June, and I. We’d venture out into the city and try a new restaurant. Each week or so we’d give one a try. “It’s no New York,” June would joke about San Diego’s food scene. “It’s no Los Angeles,” Katie’d joke back. 

Katie and I don’t try out new restaurants anymore. Or not too much. I hadn’t put it together until writing these very sentences, but that change is doubtlessly a kind of grieving. 

June and I would also have coffee together in Hillcrest before heading into campus. Usually Thursday mornings, but also other days when we could make it work. And she’d give me a ride to school after. For years we’d meet at Bread n Cie, when I lived on that side of Hillcrest. Then at Filter when I moved east of the 163. These coffees were regular things up until her illness took her away from us, took her back to Chicago. 

I lost two cities, lovely ones. And, vaster, 
some realms I owned, two rivers, a continent.
I miss them, but it wasn’t a disaster. 

Old habits die hard. So we began using Skype and Facetime to meet every week or so. A fortnight wouldn’t pass without me dialing her up. Talking with her. Dishing oncolleagues, spreading gossip, telling tales out of school. Katie and I saw her in the flesh one final time over spring break – just before she was honored with the mentoring award by the membership of the Children’s Literature Association. I’ll always cherish that final visit. But we carried on virtually between then and the last, dark weeks when her cursed disease made her impossible to reach. By the time she was forced to use a computer to speak for her, her side of the conversation dwindled. But not her smile. Her eyes. Lively and mischievous as ever. I’d curse and tell dirty jokes and delight her with my coarseness. 

—Even losing you (the joking voice, a gesture
I love) I shan’t have lied. It’s evident 
the art of losing’s not too hard to master 
though it may look like (Write it!) like disaster. 

June was – she is – it’s too much. Her memory a weight beyond weights. Her memory light as light. She’s still here, I want to say. Illuminating this space. Her smile. Her eyes. Her laser wit. If yesterday stands somewhere as real as now, as bright as the sun, whose rays reach us eight minutes and twenty seconds after they burst from its photosphere, our world lit by the recent past as the night sky is flecked by a more ancient time, then perhaps June still illuminates us, still warms our lives, even as her own body lies still, like some long dead and massive star. Or perhaps she’s just gone. And we, lost in darkness, carry on as best we can. With only the memory of light to guide us. I don’t know. But I want to believe her light still shines. And when the darkness comes – and, man, it’s black when it does – the memory of her warmth still warms. And if that warmth is a fiction, it’s the best kind. And I’ll take it. Because it’s all I got.


-SS

Thursday, April 25, 2019

SDSU’s Experimental Theatre Production of Hookman: a Review

Photo by Ken Jacques
On March 24, 2019, I wasn’t sure what to expect from SDSU’s experimental theatre production of Hookman, written by Lauren Yee and directed by Jennifer Eve Thorn. I mean how scary could a hamburger on a hook really be? Was the play scary? You betcha! Some of us in the audience had heard that Hookman could pop out of anywhere, so for a little more than an hour, we shared Lexi’s anxiety, but the comedy helps to lighten the mood as beginning with the first scene.


Lexi (Kennedy Garcia) returns home on a break from college and wants to hang out with her childhood best friend, Jess (Dominique Payne). The two of them are involved in a tragic car accident where Jess is killed. Lexi’s subconscious guilt over Jess’s death manifests into an urban legend from her childhood, Hookman, and haunts her for the rest of the play. Dr. Phillip Serrato, English professor of gothic literature at SDSU, joined the cast for a post-performance Q&A. Serrato explains to the audience, “Hookman is a physical manifestation of all the trauma in [Lexi].” The gothic in this work serves as a modality for discussing serious issues to include college life, date rape and #BelieveWomen, and survivor’s guilt.

The comedy blended with horror and serious topics produces an uncomfortable laughter that forces its audience to consider new perspectives. This seemed to be the case with Thorn’s vision for Yee’s Hookman. One audience member said during the Q&A that followed the production, “The comedy helped me get through it.” Serrato explains that the comedy provides “relief from the real trauma.” In this case, Lexi’s real trauma is her date rape experience and being behind the wheel when her best friend Jess died in the car accident. As for Lexi holding Hookman’s hand in the final scene, one could argue that Lexi has symbolically indicated that she has come to an understanding with her dark passenger and is coping with her grief.


Hookman is spooky on a whole different level!

(KT)

Wednesday, April 17, 2019

Real Identities and Diversity in Children’s Picture Books

On September 19, 2018, Camila Rae Castillo-Smith was born, and all of the sudden, I’m searching for picture books that tell her the story of both her Black and Mexican heritage. All of the sudden, I’m grappling with how to discuss blended heritage and culture with my first grandchild. I thought because my husband is mixed race and because my beautiful daughter is mixed race that I knew exactly how to handle this situation. But when Rocío, Camila’s mother, said that she was struggling to find books with characters that Camila could identify with, I realized this may be more difficult than I thought. The issue is complicated not only by a number of historically political notions about race, but also by the many ways that we identify ourselves, which means I have to ask some not so obvious questions.

Am I Black or African American? Is Mexican the same as Latinx? How Camila constructs her identity will have a lot to do with how we, her mother, father, and their families, define ourselves. In Roberto Carlos Garcia’s article on The Root, “So You’re Afro-Latinx. Now What?,” He notes, “America thrusts black or white upon you quickly, and you have to decide, you have to know who and what you are” (Garcia). This knowing, though, takes time as Camila comes to this realization with a barrage of influences. As she comes of age, she will work through how her family identifies themselves and hopefully discover for herself where she fits. The books that we read to her in the early stages of this development will strengthen her foundation. So, my search for picture books about children who are both Mexican and Black continues.

While there are a number of books about mixed race characters, so many of them seem to focus on children whose race is mixed with white. There are very few stories about children who celebrate their mixed minority races, and I have yet to find one about a child like Camila. My search, though not entirely in vain, reveals a collection of stories that some may say is too specific. But haven’t the books before the push for diversity also been too specific? Just as Camila will likely read books about children who are not like her, the children who are not like her should also read books about children like Camila. This helps to encourage empathy and compassion for people who are not like us.

It is the desire to see one’s self represented that leads to diverse books. “‘Diversity’ should just be called ‘reality.’ Your books, your articles, your curricula need to reflect reality” (Due). So maybe we, Camila’s family, should write the story that we’d like to tell her, children like her, and the children who want to get to know her. Children are very different, and we should be okay with acknowledging that.

I’m extremely proud that Rocío immediately saw the importance of Camila knowing who she is early on. And while I took this for granted when I was her age, I’m open to learning as my family grows.

Click here for a list of children’s picture books that celebrate diverse, real identities.

(KT)

Tuesday, April 9, 2019

"The Poet X" Is the Next Book You Need to Read




“You need to read The Poet X.”

This is what I texted all my friends as soon as I read the last line of this book; I wanted to tell every person I spoke to that this book would not get out of my head.

Born and raised in New York city and the daughter of Dominican immigrants, Acevedo was a National Poetry Slam Champion and coached for the D.C. Youth Slam Team. The Poet X is her debut novel and quickly became a New York Times Bestseller. It also has won multiple awards including the 2019 Michael L. Printz Award and the 2018 National Book Award for Young People’s Literature. With The Poet X being her debut novel, we are so impressed with her work and cannot wait to see what Acevedo comes out with next. 


The Poet X is a breathtaking novel in verse narrated by the protagonist, Xiomara Batista, who is a passionate and headstrong young Afro-Latina woman growing up in Harlem. Xiomara slowly falls in love with poetry, especially spoken word poetry. Xiomara pours her emotions and reflections of her day to day life into her poetry journal, commenting on topics ranging from pressures from her mother’s religion to gender to sexuality.

Acevedo told Publisher’s Weekly that she “pulls from her experience working with teens and her own high school journals”, which clearly is seen in her poetry, which truly channeling the emotions we can relate to from our teen years. She points to her being first-generation influencing her writing: There are a lot of the cultural things that inspired aspects of Xiomara, like the ways in which who you are outside of your house is a little bit different than who you must be inside because of the cultural norms that exist. That push and pull that Xiomara carries of being first-generation is something I share.” (Publisher’s Weekly, 2018) Because of her own personal connection, her words evoke so much more meaning and carry weight of being something she has lived through.


Xiomara’s words haunted me at every moment I set down this book. A particularly impactful poem is In Front of My Locker (218). In the poem a boy at school grabs Xiomara inappropriately, and instead of waiting for her friend and crush Aman to say something, she has the realization of not needing to wait for anyone. In the poem In Front of My Locker we see Xiomara standing up for herself:

“For the first time since I can remember I wait.
I can’t fight today. Everything inside me feels beaten…
He’s not going to curse or throw a fit.
He’s not going to do a damn thing.
Because no one will take care of me but me.” (Acevedo, 219)

Xiomara is a girl to look up to, with her strength and dedication driving her actions, even when  everything inside her “feels beaten.” Her emotions are so raw and realistic, and from the first page I found myself cheering for Xiomara and her passion for life.

Acevedo excellently captures the struggles of being a minority teen in her novel, and I can see people everywhere being able to see some of themselves in Xiomara’s story.

“There is power in the word” Xiomara says, and yes, there is power in practically every word of Acevedo’s book. (Acevedo, 353)   

(SS)

Sources:
Acevedo, Elizabeth. The Poet X. HarperTeen, 2018.
https://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/by-topic/childrens/childrens-authors/article/76224-q-a-with-elizabeth-acevedo.html

Monday, March 18, 2019

Down the Rabbit Hole with the Lewis Carroll Society of North America Spring Meeting


On Friday, March 8 and Saturday, March 9 San Diego State University had the privilege of hosting the Lewis Carroll Society of North America’s Spring Meeting, and we loved falling down the rabbit hole together. Fans and scholars of Lewis Carroll and literature alike came together for exciting talks including Kathleen Krull’s discussion of the writing and publishing of her children’s picture book “One Fun Day with Lewis Carroll”. Some familiar faces to the SDSU campus popped up in Dr. Joseph Thomas’ talk on Shel Silverstein’s “Alice” poem and Dr. Philip Serrato’s talk “It’s Not Easy Being a Girl in Heteropatriarchy.”

Kathleen Krull detailed her process of researching, writing, and publishing her picture book, “One Fun Day with Lewis Carroll: A Celebration of Wordplay and a Girl Named Alice”. After falling in love with Alice in Wonderland as a child, she wrote an entire children’s book about Lewis Carroll’s Life utilizing Carroll’s nonsense words, evoking nostalgia for the whimsical language characterizing Alice in Wonderland. 


Dr. Thomas discussed Shel Silverstein’s “Alice” poem. The symbols of childhood and play within the poem depends greatly on the knowledge of Carroll’s original Alice in Wonderland. The final lines of the poem truly stood out: “And so she changed, while other folks/Never tried nothin’ at all” (Silverstein, 1974). Another poem he discussed was Silverstein’s “The Missing Piece”, a poem about an almost complete circle rejecting his perfectly fit piece. Dr. Thomas argues that this questions the idea of perfection and “wholeness” by reversing the standards of a “happy” or “fulfilled” life (pardon the pun), much like how Alice is learning to accept more of the incongruous aspects of life.


Dr. Serrato’s “It’s Not Easy Being a Girl in a Heteropatriarchy” upended traditional readings with a gothic reading of Alice’s in Wonderland. Under the guise of a simple children’s fantasy tale, Dr. Serrato brought to light recycled gothic features such as the beloved White Rabbit being a symbol of repressed trauma, and Alice inhabiting the specter of seeing motherhood as fearsome and unnerving. You can say I am never looking at my favorite childhood book the same again.


The meeting concluded with a visit to the once-lost Alice in Wonderland mural hidden on our very own SDSU campus. This beautiful mural was found under layers of paint and restored by Dr. Seth Mallios and his dedicated team, and we are so lucky to have a historic piece that artfully represents the impact that Carroll has had on past SDSU students.

We had so much fun and we hope we get the opportunity to host the Lewis Carroll Society of North America Again!

(SS)

For a video of Dr. Joseph T. Thomas's talk visit https://youtu.be/iARmr-wmwNo.

Works Cited:
Silverstein, Shel. Where the Sidewalk Ends. Harper Collins Publishers, 1974.

Friday, March 8, 2019

Lewis Carroll Society of North America Spring Meeting




Join us for the Lewis Carroll Society of North America Spring Meeting Friday, March 8 and Saturday, March 9, 2019! Various events and readings will be held throughout Friday and Saturday, including our very own Dr. Joseph Thomas’ talk on Shel Silverstein’s “Alice” poem and Dr. Philip Serrato’s talk “It’s Not Easy Being a Girl in Heteropatriarchy.”
The meeting starts Friday, March 8 at 10:30 AM with the Maxine and David Schaefer Memorial Reading in the San Diego Central Library. The meeting concludes with Iain McCaig’s “Opus Alice: The Madness of Re-Illustrating Alice Returns! Activities also include a tour of the Children’s Library and Rare Book Room, and a visit to the once-lost Alice in Wonderland mural.
The meeting is free and open to SDSU faculty, staff, students, and the wider San Diego community. 
We can’t wait to see you there!
(SS)